Introduction

The way we communicate has changed a lot over time, from smoke signals and messenger pigeons to technology like telephone and email. We’ve been making new ways to communicate for as long as we’ve been on this planet.

The electric telegraph was one of the most critical changes in communication that happened in 1831 when it was made. While postal communication has been around for a long time, electrical engineering in the 1800s made a big difference.

Digital communication methods have now surpassed almost all forms of communication, especially in the business world. If I had to write a letter at work, I can’t remember when. Even my signature is now digital. It’s also scarce for me to pick up the phone. I prefer FaceTime or Zoom instead.

In my mind, it’s pretty amazing how far communication has come in the last few years.

The Telephone

When the phone was first made in 1849, it was a must-have for homes and businesses in 50 years. Tethering limited the phone’s flexibility and privacy, however. Cell phones came after that. Motorola made a mobile phone in 1973, which started a series of changes that changed how people communicated for good.

Businesses mostly used early smartphones to connect phones and personal digital assistants (PDAs), but they were heavy and didn’t last very long. Nokia first made phones with QWERTY keyboards in 1996. By 2010, most Android phones were only touchscreens.

In 2007, Apple set the stage for the look of today’s smartphones when Steve Jobs showed off the first iPhone. “Flip phones” and phones with split keypads and screens were the norm before the iPhone came out. A year later, a central application store was set up, with 500 apps that could be downloaded. The Apple App Store now has more than two million apps.

The Internet

There has been a significant change in communication since the mid-1990s when email, instant messaging, voice over the Internet Protocol (VoIP) phone calls, two-way interactive video chats, discussion forums, blogs, and social networking came out.

The internet has made communication easier and faster, allowing us to stay in touch with people no matter where they are or what time. They say it has sped up business and given businesses more options. People have been able to find their voice through social media like Instagram, YouTube, and memes. No other thing has brought us together and broken us apart like the internet.

Email

Despite its long history, the World Wide Web made email accessible to all in 1991. It has changed our lives in a big way, either for good or bad, depending on how you look at it. The first people to use the messaging network were schools and the military, who used email to communicate. The number of people who used email in 2018 was more than half of the world’s population. According to estimates, three hundred thirty-three billion emails will be sent every day by 2022.

As important as email is, new technologies are coming out that give it a run for its money. A company called Slack stands for “Searchable Log of All Communication and Knowledge”. It was founded in 2014 and has been called an “email killer,” but it is not the only one. If you use Slack, you are one of 10 million people who use it every day. Email is still going strong. When Slack changes, users who still rely on email can now be part of collaborative projects.

Wearable Technology

As soon as it came out in 1999, a hands-free mobile headset was linked with city workers because they used it to work in the city. It made it possible for business owners to take calls while moving, even while they were in their cars.

Scientists would have thought 10 years ago that making a video call from something other than your cell phone was impossible. Thanks to smartwatches, audio sunglasses, and other new wearable technologies, you can use these skills every day.

Virtual Reality (VR)

Even though the next generation of virtual reality (VR) has only been around since 2016, it has already changed the way people communicate. Even if people are on different continents, the beauty of VR, called “presence,” means you can interact with someone in the same area simultaneously, without having to spend time and money on a trip.

Another benefit of VR is that it helps people improve their communication skills. There is much information in a normal conversation that isn’t said. This information can be translated into VR. Interpreting the participants’ feelings and intentions is easier when they speak in a specific tone, pause, and move their heads and hands. With VR, there are no distractions, so people can focus on what is going on around them without worrying about anything else. Because MeetinVR says virtual reality meetings make people pay more attention than video calls. It gives a better experience in gaming like PUBG.

Furthermore, research shows that after using virtual reality, we remember more of what we learned and can better apply what we learned. 3D is a natural way to communicate that doesn’t have to be limited by language or technology.

5G

The fifth generation of mobile networks, or 5G, promises much faster download and upload speeds and more coverage and stable connections. These benefits will make communication a lot better. Instant communication will be available, and those long, choppy video chats will be history.

The average 4G transmission speed that our phones can use right now is about 21 Mbps. 5G will be 100 to 1000 times faster than the technology we have now. According to the Consumer Technology Association, a two-hour movie can be downloaded in 3.6 seconds, faster than 6 minutes on 4G or 26 hours on 3G, but slower than 6 minutes on 4G or 26 hours on 3G. A new technology called 5G will impact far beyond our phones. It will allow many devices to connect at the same time.

There has already been talking about 6G in the future, but it isn’t yet. As far as innovation goes, even though it’s still in the early stages of development, it’s interesting. The connected paradise we want to live in will be built on 6G, which will make a massive difference in the speed and consistency of our communication.

Conclusion

The way we communicate has changed a lot over time, from smoke signals and messenger pigeons to the telephone and email. The electric telegraph was one of the most critical changes in communication that happened in 1831 when it was made. When the phone was first made in 1849, it was a must-have for homes and businesses in 50 years. It was founded in 2014 and has been called an “email killer,” but it is not the only one. The connected paradise we want to live in will be built on 6G, which will make a massive difference in the speed and consistency of our communication.

Thus from the above discussion, we conclude that technology plays a vital role in the evolution of communication.

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